Actin in Mung Bean Mitochondria and Implications for Its Function

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2011
Authors:Lo, Y-S, Cheng, N, Hsiao, L-J, Annamalai, A, Jauh, G-Y, Wen, T-N, Dai, H, Chiang, K-S
Journal:The Plant Cell
Volume:23
Issue:10
Date Published:2011
ISBN Number:10404651
Keywords:cotyledon, Vigna
Abstract:

Here, a large fraction of plant mitochondrial actin was found to be resistant to protease and high-salt treatments, suggesting it was protected by mitochondrial membranes. A portion of this actin became sensitive to protease or high-salt treatment after removal of the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that some actin is located inside the mitochondrial outer membrane. The import of an actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein into the mitochondria in a transgenic plant, actimGFP, was visualized in living cells and demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses. Polymerized actin was found in mitochondria ofactimGFP plants and in mung bean (Vigna radiata). Notably, actin associated with mitochondria purified from early-developing cotyledons during seed germination was sensitive to high-salt and protease treatments. With cotyledon aging, mitochondrial actin became more resistant to both treatments. The progressive import of actin into cotyledon mitochondria appeared to occur in concert with the conversion of quiescent mitochondria into active forms during seed germination. The binding of actin to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was demonstrated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Porin and ADP/ATP carrier proteins were also found in mtDNA-protein complexes. Treatment with an actin depolymerization reagent reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and triggered the release of cytochrome C. The potential function of mitochondrial actin and a possible actin import pathway are discussed.

URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/41433873
Short Title:The Plant Cell
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