IBIS-Flora

Angiosperm Flora of India

Pollination and Reproduction in Natural and Mitigation Populations of the Many-Stemmed Dudleya, Dudleya multicaulis (Crassulaceae)

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2010
Authors:C. Jones, E, Shropshire, FM, Allen, RL, Atallah, YC
Journal:Madroño
Volume:57
Issue:1
Date Published:2010
ISBN Number:0024-9637
Keywords:Crassulaceae
Abstract:

Abstract We investigated the reproductive biology of the rare and endangered plant, Dudleya multicaulis at five separate sites, three natural and two mitigation sites. We employed dawn to dusk observations to determine the spectrum of pollinators visiting D. multicaulis, took pollen samples from visitors to determine floral constancy, sampled nectar to determine volume produced per flower, examined the number of flowers per inflorescence, the number of those flowers that produced seed, and total seed set to determine reproductive output, completed seed germination tests to determine viability, and transplanted germinated seedlings from Petri dishes to soil to determine how well seedlings survive transplanting. Dudleya multicaulis was visited by flower beetles, native and European honey bees, flies, and a variety of other insects. Nectar production per flower averaged 0.12 µl. Bees averaged 99% floral constancy to D. multicaulis. Reproductive output measured by flower production and fruit/seed set were not significantly different among sites. Among all populations, the average fruit set ranged from 86.9 to 94.4%. The large fruit set coupled with the diversity of floral visitors suggests that D. multicaaulis is not pollinator limited. Data suggest that D. multicaulis is capable of self-pollination in absence of vectors. Seed germination and transplanted seedling survival did not differ significantly among sites. Results suggest that sowing seed may be better for plant establishment rather than transplanting when mitigation is necessitated.Abstract We investigated the reproductive biology of the rare and endangered plant, Dudleya multicaulis at five separate sites, three natural and two mitigation sites. We employed dawn to dusk observations to determine the spectrum of pollinators visiting D. multicaulis, took pollen samples from visitors to determine floral constancy, sampled nectar to determine volume produced per flower, examined the number of flowers per inflorescence, the number of those flowers that produced seed, and total seed set to determine reproductive output, completed seed germination tests to determine viability, and transplanted germinated seedlings from Petri dishes to soil to determine how well seedlings survive transplanting. Dudleya multicaulis was visited by flower beetles, native and European honey bees, flies, and a variety of other insects. Nectar production per flower averaged 0.12 µl. Bees averaged 99% floral constancy to D. multicaulis. Reproductive output measured by flower production and fruit/seed set were not significantly different among sites. Among all populations, the average fruit set ranged from 86.9 to 94.4%. The large fruit set coupled with the diversity of floral visitors suggests that D. multicaaulis is not pollinator limited. Data suggest that D. multicaulis is capable of self-pollination in absence of vectors. Seed germination and transplanted seedling survival did not differ significantly among sites. Results suggest that sowing seed may be better for plant establishment rather than transplanting when mitigation is necessitated.

URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3120/0024-9637-57.1.42
Short Title:Madroño
Taxonomic name: 
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