IBIS-Flora

Angiosperm Flora of India

A Reduced-Function Allele Reveals That EARLY FLOWERING3 Repressive Action on the Circadian Clock Is Modulated by Phytochrome Signals in Arabidopsis

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2011
Authors:Kolmos, E, Herrero, E, Bujdoso, N, Millar, AJ, Tóth, R, Gyula, P, Nagy, F, DAVIS, SETHJ
Journal:The Plant Cell
Volume:23
Issue:9
Date Published:2011
ISBN Number:10404651
Abstract:

Arabidopsis thaliana EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) is essential for the generation of circadian rhythms. ELF3 has been proposed to restrict light signals to the oscillator through phytochrome photoreceptors, but that has not been explicitly shown. Furthermore, the genetic action of ELF3 within the clock had remained elusive. Here, we report a functional characterization of ELF3 through the analysis of the elf3-12 alíele, which encodes an amino acid replacement in a conserved domain. Circadian oscillations persisted, and unlike elf3 null alíeles, elf3-12 resulted in a short circadian period only under ambient light. The period shortening effect of elf3-12 was enhanced by the overexpression of phytochromes phyA and phyB. We found that elf3-12 was only modestly perturbed in resetting of the oscillator and in gating light-regulated gene expression. Furthermore, elf3-12 essentially displayed wild-type development. We identified targets of ELF3 transcriptional repression in the oscillator, highlighting the action at the morning gene PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORS Taken together, we identified two separable roles for ELF3, one affecting the circadian network and the other affecting light input to the oscillator. This is consistent with a dual function of ELF3 as both an integrator of phytochrome signals and a repressor component of the core oscillator.

URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/41434694
Short Title:The Plant Cell
Fri, 2014-01-24 21:58 -- admin
https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/5ade1b012674ce3dd941e2ea5dd15cc1.jpg?d=https%3A//flora.indianbiodiversity.org/sites/all/modules/patches/contrib/gravatar/avatar.png&s=100&r=G
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith